Surfer/Shaper Jake Moss with twin keel "fish." PHOTO : LUNDAHL

Surfer/Shaper Jake Moss with twin keel "fish." PHOTO : LUNDAHL

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The few people making 'green' boards have run in to two problems; the performance is never as good as a conventional surfboard, and they haven't been able to demonstrate them as eco-friendly

Moss Research Announces "Industry-First" Sustainable Surfboards

Eco-Flex™ Technologies Gain Sustainability Endorsement

(PRWEB)

Solana Beach, CA (PRWEB) January 26, 2014 -- Master surfboard shaper Jake Moss, 15 year manufacturer of Moss Research Surfboards announces the availability of a new collection of surfboards, which define the industry standard in meeting sustainability criteria relating to human, environmental, economic, and social impacts.

One minute movie describes Moss Research construction techniques for recycled and recycle–able surfboards.

Up until now, Surfboard making has arguably been one of the least "eco-friendly" crafts around. The traditional surfboard manufacturing process is toxic and emits gases known to be hazardous to shapers; the process depletes the ozone layer, and contributes to global warming. Previously, alternatives have not resulted in performance improvements for surfers. "The few people making 'green' boards have run in to two problems; the performance is never as good as a conventional surfboard, and they haven't been able to demonstrate them as eco-friendly," says Jake Moss. "Our Eco-boards, refined over the past 4 years, are better to surf than conventional boards. And we've worked hard to establish that our construction processes and materials are, in fact, more environmentally friendly."

Moss Research Eco–Flex Surfboard. PHOTO : LUNDAHL

Moss Research Eco–Flex Surfboard. PHOTO : LUNDAHL

The custom line of Moss Research boards use "Eco-Flex" technology, which gets its name from a construction process using plant fibers, a 100% recycled core and an ultra strong and elastic plant-based, non-VOC (volatile organic compound) resin.

According to Moss, "The performance surfboard never had a sustainable beginning." In the late 1950's the lightweight surfboard, using a polyurethane core reinforced with fiberglass and polyester resin was introduced. It was a performance breakthrough, however, at a time where there were few surfers and little consideration to the waste streams produced. To date, a majority of boards are still made of the same materials, toxic and non-recyclable plastics, containing diisocyanates (MDI, TDI) and VOCs.

Now, with a world surfing population of over 10 million, with each surfer owning an average of 3 boards, there are over 30 million surfboards in use. These boards will eventually become garbage, with no way to down-cycle the resources. "Plastic recycling has never been a 'closed loop', with over 30% of all plastics having the potential to end up in the ocean, in the North Pacific Gyre. That's a horrific version of the future that no surfer wants to help create", Moss says.

Moss Research Twin Keel Fish and Spacecake. PHOTO : LUNDAHL

Moss Research Twin Keel Fish and Spacecake. PHOTO : LUNDAHL

To help correct the situation, Moss Research uses a 100% recycled, closed-cell EPS (Expanded Polystyrene) foam blank, introduced by California supplier Marko Foam. They use a new, sustainable recycling technology that is able to make "1st quality" high-performance blanks comprised of post-consumer packing and industrial EPS waste. The material can be re-collected and re-processed again and again to truly support a closed loop effort that reduces the amount of EPS Foam waste entering the landfill--or the ocean. The recycled blanks weigh half as much as conventional polyurethane blanks and have a water absorption rate at a small fraction compared, so even dinged boards won't take on excessive water. "This means your board won't suck, literally," says Moss. "It also means Eco-Flex boards last longer, with the option to recycle the core once it has finally succumb to the elements."

The laminating resin has been replaced with plant-based "Super Sap" from manufacturer Entropy Resins, at a bio content concentration of up to 75%. Their process captures pinesap from papermaking and renewable oils from bio-fuel industry waste, and formulates them into an ultra durable epoxy resin. "Super Sap" emits no VOC's and does not require the use of harmful solvents or surfacing agents.

With all major components made domestically in the United States, mostly comprised of captured waste from other industrial processes, the end result is a board with a significantly lower carbon footprint, a healthier manufacturing environment, and a better experience for surfers.

The Moss Research Eco-Flex surfboards are the first to receive an Endorsement of Sustainability, based on a set of environmental standards for sustainable surfboard manufacturing developed by the Sustainable Surf Coalition (read more at http://sustainablesurfcoalition.org).

Tobias Schultz, author of "Surfboard Cradle-to-Grave", reviewed and approved Moss Research's Endorsement application. "After a lengthy review process, Moss Research's Eco-Flex boards satisfy the requirements of a sustainable surfboard, including use of domestic supply chain, company transparency, craftsmanship and durability," says Schultz. Schultz is working with Moss Research to create a Company Sustainability Report (CSR) for 2011, the first in the surfboard industry, which will be completed later this year.

Moss Research Sustainable Surfboards with "Eco-Flex" technologies can be seen at http://www.mossresearch.com/

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In a remote corner of the Mojave Desert, 15 miles from Las Vegas, stands the expansive Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System. Occupying 5 square miles, the facility seems to swallow up a stunning expanse of desert including animals, plants and now, spiritual and cultural resources.

Solar power and Native American rights clash in the Mojave Desert

http://www.enn.com/top_stories/article/48460

Alfredo Figueroa atop Metamorphic Rock/Traditional Ceremony. From "Who Are My People?" documentary film, ©Robert Lundahl, 2015.

Alfredo Figueroa atop Metamorphic Rock/Traditional Ceremony. From "Who Are My People?" documentary film, ©Robert Lundahl, 2015.

Native elders filed a suit against the Department of the Interior, Bureau of Land Management, and the Department of Energy in 2010, for failure to properly consult with the tribes in regard to the development of six renewable projects.

Litigants Alfredo Figueroa (Yaqui/Chemehuevi), Phillip Smith (Chemehuevi), and Reverend Ron Van Fleet (Mojave) complain that the government and the companies involved have lent a deaf ear to their concerns, which has brought a new level of anxiety and spiritual pain to people who have long felt their voices muffled in the face of commercial development by others.

Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, Under Construction, 2012. PHOTO : LUNDAHL

Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, Under Construction, 2012. PHOTO : LUNDAHL

Mojave elder Reverend Ron Van Fleet said the rituals he has performed at a sacred site within Ivanpah’s enclosure cannot be meaningfully replicated, in accordance with his tradition and values, at any other location.

The fence around Ivanpah has become a testimony to the extent Native American spiritual beliefs are under attack by the siting of utility scale solar plants in the desert.

On April 10, California’s 9th Circuit Court of Appeals heard an appeal. The immediate question was access; the underlying issue is freedom of religion.

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California’s water situation is beyond an emergency, according to Healdsburg resident Dave Howard. He and his sons returned from a “ski trip” in Northern California.

California's Water Situation is Beyond an Emergency

http://www.enn.com/climate/article/48415

David Howard & Robert Lundahl

“The peaks are as bald as they normally are in August! Where’s the snow pack that’s supposed to be providing us water all summer? It’s zero folks. There is nothing there,” he said.

Ski Runs at Northstar, Lake Tahoe. PHOTO : David Howard

Ski Runs at Northstar, Lake Tahoe. PHOTO : David Howard

They proceeded on to Northstar ski resort. On a normal year there are more than a hundred runs. The temperatures are low enough and Northstar is making it’s own snow. Dave dropped his sons off, to go ahead.

“They did one run, then called me and said, ‘Dad we’re done. This is stupid. There is only one run worth doing and everyone is on it. This is not even worth spending any time on,” said Dave.

He added, “Northstar is scraping for their lives. Where’s their Spring skiing? It doesn’t exist. There in March, they’ve had a bad season already and its not going to get any better. There’s no hope on the horizon for those guys.”

Truckee River at River Ranch, Lake Tahoe. PHOTO : David Howard

Truckee River at River Ranch, Lake Tahoe. PHOTO : David Howard

Co-incidentally, Governor Jerry Brown issued a press release stating,”Today we are standing on dry grass where there should be five feet of snow. This historic drought demands unprecedented action. Therefore, I’m issuing an executive order mandating substantial water reductions across our state. As Californians, we must pull together and save water in every way possible.”

Cities and towns across California are to reduce their water usage by 25%. This is expected “to save approximately 1.5 million acre-feet of water over the next nine months, or nearly as much as is currently in Lake Oroville.”

“To save more water now, the order will also:

  • Replace 50 million square feet of lawns throughout the state with drought tolerant landscaping in partnership with local governments;

  • Direct the creation of a temporary, statewide consumer rebate program to replace old appliances with more water and energy efficient models;

  • Require campuses, golf courses, cemeteries and other large landscapes to make significant cuts in water use; and

  • Prohibit new homes and developments from irrigating with potable water unless water-efficient drip irrigation systems are used, and ban watering of ornamental grass on public street medians.”

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CARE SUES ENERGY DEPARTMENT OVER LOAN GUARANTEES

Department of Energy Approved Solyndra and Other Projects Without Required Oversight, Say Plaintiffs.

(PRWEB)

Inland Empire, CA (PRWEB) — On November 28, 2011, CAlifornians for Renewable Energy (CARE) and Michael Boyd filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia to challenge more than two dozen federal loan guarantees illegally issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Section 1705 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The lawsuit seeks to invalidate 26 loan guarantees for utility-scale renewable-energy projects, including guarantees to the now-bankrupt Solyndra Inc. and Beacon Corporation, because DOE issued them before putting in place regulations that would enable it to properly vet projects and make sure they are unlikely to fail.

“The Solyndra and Beacon bankruptcies are Exhibit A for why DOE should have issued regulations before putting taxpayers on the hook.”

“The Solyndra and Beacon bankruptcies are Exhibit A for why DOE should have issued regulations before putting taxpayers on the hook.”

“No matter how you feel about federal loan guarantees as a matter of policy, the reality is that Congress passed a law prohibiting DOE from issuing guarantees until it put regulations in place to protect the taxpayer from Section 1705 projects with no realistic chance of success,” explained Cory Briggs, the attorney for the plaintiffs. “The Solyndra and Beacon bankruptcies are Exhibit A for why DOE should have issued regulations before putting taxpayers on the hook.”

Michael Boyd, the president of CARE and a plaintiff, lamented the way that big business with connections to the White House under Presidents Bush and Obama where given such easy access to the publicʼs purse. He describes the loan guarantees as “corporate cronyism at its worst.” CARE works to promote public education concerning renewable energy and has been a consistent advocate for environmentally and community-sensitive energy projects that reduce greenhouse gases and that are commercially viable without inappropriate taxpayer subsidies.

For more information about CARE, please visit www.calfree.com. For more information about the lawsuit, please contact Cory Briggs at 909-949-7115 or at info@briggslawcorp.com.

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